gv-08



OccidentalismDuc, sequere, aut de via decede!HomeArchivesHall of Shame화병 FAQTagsTemporary DatabaseLies, Half-truths, & Dokdo Video, Part 8
April 7th, 2007 . by Gerry-Bevers
An Yong-bok, Usando, & Matsushima (Songdo)

In a September 25, 1696 entry in the Annals of King Sukjong, An Yong-bok told Korean authorities that he had a confrontation with Japanese fishermen in the waters near Ulleungdo in May of that year. Here is part of An Yong-bok’s testimony:

備邊司推問安龍福等。 龍福以爲: “渠本居東萊, 爲省母至蔚山, 適逢僧雷憲等, 備說頃年往來鬱陵島事, 且言本島海物之豐富, 雷憲等心利之。 遂同乘船, 與寧海篙工劉日夫等, 俱發到本島, 主山三峰, 高於三角, 自南至北, 爲二日程, 自東至西亦然。 山多雜木、鷹、烏猫, 倭船亦多來泊, 船人皆恐。 渠倡言: ‘鬱島本我境, 倭人何敢越境侵犯? 汝等可共縳之。’ 仍進船頭大喝, 倭言: ‘吾等本住松島, 偶因漁採出來。 今當還往本所。’ 松島卽子山島, 此亦我國地, 汝敢住此耶?’An Yong-bok was investigated at the Bibyeonsa, where he said the following:

I am originally from Dongrae (東萊), but I went to see my mother in Ulsan, where I met Monk Noi Heon (雷憲) and others. I told them in detail about my recent trips to Ulleungdo, which I said was an island with many products. Noi Heon and the others were interested, and we finally boarded a boat with a sailor from Yeonghae (寧海) named Yu Il-bu and others and sailed to the island. The main mountain, Sambong (三峯), was taller than Mount Samgak (三角山). From north to south it was two days travel, and it was the same from east to west. On the mountain there were a variety of trees and many hawks, crows, and wildcats. There were also many Japanese ships anchored there, which frightened the sailors.

I stepped forward to the bow of the boat and yelled, “Ulleungdo is our territory. How dare you Japanese trespass? I have to arrest all of you.”

The Japanese said, “We are originally from Songdo (松島 – Matsushima), but by chance came here to catch fish. We were just getting ready to return.”

Then I said, “Songdo is Jasando (子山島) and that is also our country’s land. How dare you live there?” ….

Koreans claim that “Songdo” was a reference to Liancourt Rocks, which the Japanese were calling Matsushima (Songdo) at the time. And based on that, Koreans claim that Jasando (Usando) was, therefore, the old Korean name for Liancourt Rocks (Dokdo). The problem with that reasoning, however, is that Korean maps at that time were showing Usando to be a neighboring island of Ulleungdo, not Liancourt Rocks.

The following is a Korean map of Ulleungdo made by Samcheok Commander Pak Chang-seok (朴昌錫) in 1711.



The above map shows a small island off the east coast of Ulleungdo labeled as “Usando” (于山島). The following is a closeup shot of the island:



Notice that written on the small island is the following:

海長竹田 — 所謂 于山島
Fields of haejang bamboo — the so-called Usando

Haejang bamboo can grow up to twenty feet tall, which means that the Usando shown on the map could not have been Liancourt Rocks since they were just barren rocks without the soil needed to grow bamboo. However, Ulleungdo’s neighboring island of Jukdo, which is about 2.2 kilometers off Ulleungdo’s east shore did have the soil to grow haejang bamboo. In fact, after an inspection of Ulleungdo in 1694, Korean inspector Jang Han-sang (張漢相) reported the following:

東方五里許有一小島不甚高大海長竹叢生於一面

There is a small island about five ri (two kilometers) to the east (of Ulleungdo) that is not very high and not very big and has thickly growing haejang bamboo on one side.”

The island mentioned in the above report was almost certainly Ulleungdo’s neighboring island of Jukdo, which is 2.2 kilometers off Ulleungdo’s east shore. Also, the Usando on the 1711 map was almost certainly Ulleungdo’s neighboring island of Jukdo based on its location and the fact that it was also labeled as having fields of haejang bamboo.

We cannot be sure which island An Yong-bok was referring to when he said that “Songdo was Usando” since his testimony was confusing and inconsistant. For example, his distances to Ulleungdo from the Korean mainland and Liancourt Rocks did not match up. However, regardless of whether An Yong-bok’s Usando was a reference to Liancourt Rocks or to Ulleungdo’s neighoring island of Jukdo, the Joseon government obviously considered Usando to be Ulleungdo’s neighboring island of Jukdo, which eventually led to Koreans, themselves, to start referring to Ulleungdo’s neighboring island of Jukdo as “Songdo. The finale came in 1882, when King Kojong, himself, said that Songdo was another name for Ulleungdo’s neighboring island of Jukdo.

From An Yong-bok’s “Songdo” to King Kojong’s “Songdo”

After the An Yong-bok incident in the 1690s, Joseon Korea became interested in Ulleungdo and began sending inspectors to the island on a regular basis. One result of the An Yongbok incident was that Korean maps started showing Usando as a small island to the east of Ulleungdo, instead of the west, which was the case on previous maps.

Here are more maps of Ulleungdo, made after the An Yong-bok Incident. Notice that Usando is shown as a small, neighboring island off Ulleungdo’s the east shore.



The above map of Ulleungdo comes from the Haedongjido, which was made about 1750. Notice that Usando was shown as a small, neighboring island of Ulleungdo, located very close to where Ulleungdo’s neighboring island of Jukdo is today.


The above is a map of Ulleungdo from the Yeojido, which was made between 1736 and 1767. Notice that it shows Usando just off the east shore of Ulleungdo in a location very close to when Ulleungdo’s neighboring island of Jukdo is today.


The above map of Ulleungdo comes from the Joseonjido and was probably made sometime between 1750 and 1768. Again, it shows Usando (于山) as a neighboring island of Ulleungdo in a location very close to where Ulleungdo’s neighboring island of Jukdo is today. In fact, there were even grid lines drawn to help show the location of Usando in relation to the main island of Ulleungdo, which is about ten kilometers wide.


The above map of Ulleungdo is from the Jiseung and was made sometime between 1776 and 1800. Again, it shows Usando as a small island off the east coast of Ulleungdo in a location very close to where Ulleungdo’s neighboring island of Jukdo is today.

All the above maps span a time frame from about 1711 to 1800, and they all show Usando in a location very close to where Ulleungdo’s neighboring island of Jukdo is today. All the maps also show Usando as a single island, not as two large rocks, which is what Liancourt Rocks (Dokdo) essentially is.

Now consider the following statement from Korea’s Dongguk Munheon Bigo (東國文獻備考), which was written in 1770:

輿地志云 鬱陵于山皆于山國地, 于山則倭所謂松島也

According to the Yeojiji, Ulleung and Usan together were Usanguk. Usan is Japan’s so-called Songdo (Matsushima).

The above statement was written at a time when all of Korea’s maps of Ulleungdo were showing Usando in a location very close to where Ulleungdo’s neighboring island of Jukdo is today. When considered in combination with Korea’s own maps, the above statement is essentially saying that Ulleungdo’s neighboring island of Jukdo was Japan’s “Songdo” (Matsushima).

The following was part of an October 1, 1793 record entry in Korea’s Ilseongrok (日省錄):

臣按本曹謄錄蔚陵外島其名松島卽古于山國也

The attendant observed that in the Yejo record that Ulleung and its neighboring was also called “Songdo” was the old country of Usan.

Notice that by 1793, “Songdo” (松島 – Matsushima) was being used to refer to Ulleungdo and its neighboring islands, which used to be called the Country of Usan.

In 1808, the following was written in Korea’s Mangiyoram (萬機要覽):

輿地志云 鬱陵于山皆于山國地, 于山則倭所謂松島也

According to the Yeojiji (輿地志), Ulleung and Usan together were Usanguk. Usan is Japan’s so-called Songdo (Matsushima).

Notice that the above statement is the same statement that was written in the 1770 Dongguk Munheon Bigo (東國文獻備考). In 1808, Koreans were continuing to say that Usando was Japan’s “so-called” Songdo (Matsushima). At the same time, Korean maps were continuing to show Usando as Ulleungdo’s neighboring island of Jukdo.

The following map was made in 1835 and is called the Cheonggudo (靑邱圖). The gird marks along the edge of the map represent distances of ten Korean ri. One Korean ri equaled 400 meters (0.4 kilometers).



Notice that the small island labeled as “Usan” is about one gird-marker distance off the east shore of Ulleungdo, which means it would have been about 4 kilometers offshore. Ulleungdo’s neighboring island of Jukdo is about 2.2 kilometers off Ulleungdo’s east shore, which means that the island labeled as “Usan” on the above map was almost certainly Ulleungdo’s neighboring island of Jukdo.

In December 1869, the Japanese Foreign Ministry sent officials to Joseon Korea to gather information on the country. In their 1870 report, the following was written about Ulleungdo:



Here is the translation of the above text:

How Takeshima & Matsushima Became Part of Chosun

Matsushima (Songdo) is a neighboring island of Takeshima (Ulleungdo). We have no previous records of Matsushima. In regard to Takeshima, after the Genroku years (1688 – 1704), Chosun (Korea) sent people there to live for awhile, but now, as before, it is uninhabited. It produces bamboo and also reeds thicker than bamboo. Ginseng and other products also grow naturally. We have also heard that there is an abundance of marine products.

Notice that the document says that Matsushima (Songdo) was a neighboring island of Ulleungdo and that the Japanese had no records of it. In other words, Koreans told the Japanese that “Songdo” (Matsushima) was Ulleungdo’s neighboring island. The document does not mention anything about Usando, which had been appearing on Korean maps and in Korean documents up until then. This suggests that by 1870, the name “Songdo” had replaced “Usando” as, or was a substitute for, the name of Ulleungdo’s neighboring island. This was corroborated in 1882 by King Kojong in a conversation with Lee Gyu-won, who was preparing to leave for an inspection of Ulleungdo. Here is what was said:

召見檢察使李奎遠 辭陛也 敎曰 鬱陵島近有他國人物之無常往來 任自占便之弊云矣 且松竹島芋山島 在於鬱陵島之傍 而其相距遠近何如 亦有何物與否 未能詳知 今番爾行 特爲擇差者 各別檢察 且將設邑爲計 必以圖形與別單 詳紀錄達也 奎遠曰 芋山島卽鬱陵島 而芋山 古之國都名也 松竹島卽一小島 而與鬱陵島 相距爲三數十里 其所産 卽檀香與簡竹云矣 敎曰 或稱芋山島 或稱松竹島 皆輿地勝覽所載也 而又稱松島竹島與芋山島爲三島統稱鬱陵島矣 其形便一體檢察 鬱陵島本以三陟營將越松萬戶 輪回搜檢者 而擧皆未免疎忽 只以外面探來 故致有此弊 爾則必詳細察得也 奎遠曰 謹當深入檢察矣 或稱松島竹島 在於鬱陵島之東 而此非松竹島以外 別有松島竹島也 敎曰 或有所得聞於曾往搜檢人之說耶 奎遠曰 曾往搜檢之人 未得逢著 而轉聞其梗개矣.

“우산도는 바로 울릉도이며 우산(芋山)이란 바로 옛날의 우산국의 국도(國都) 이름입니다. 송죽도는 하나의 작은 섬인데 울릉도와 떨어진 거리는 30리(里)쯤 됩니다. 여기서 나는 물건은 단향(檀香)과 간죽(簡竹)이라고 합니다.”

하였다. 하교하기를,

“우산도라고도 하고 송죽도라고도 하는데 다 《동국여지승람(東國輿地勝覽)》에 실려있다. 그리고 또 혹은 송도·죽도라고도 하는데 우산도와 함께 이 세 섬을 통칭 울릉도라고 하였다. 그 형세에 대하여 함께 알아보라.

울릉도는 본래 삼척 영장(三陟營將)과 월송 만호(越松萬戶)가 돌려가면서 수검(搜檢)하던 곳인데 거의 다 소홀히 함을 면하지 못하였다. 그저 외부만 살펴보고 돌아왔기 때문에 이런 폐단이 있었다. 그대는 반드시 상세히 살펴보라.”

하니, 이규원이 아뢰기를,

“삼가 깊이 들어가서 검찰하겠습니다. 어떤 사람들은 송도와 죽도는 울릉도의 동쪽에 있다고 하지만 이것은 송죽도 밖에 따로 송도와 죽도가 있는 것은 아닙니다.”

하였다. 하교하기를,

“혹시 그전에 가서 수검한 사람의 말을 들은 것이 있는가?”

하니, 이규원이 아뢰기를,

“그전에 가서 수검한 사람은 만나지 못하였으나 대체적인 내용을 전해 들었습니다.”

하였다.

The king called Lee Gyu-won forward to give his pre-departure greeting.

The king said, “It is said that these days there is the evil practice of foreigners freely coming and going to Ulleungdo and doing as they please. Also, Songjukdo (松竹島 – 송죽도) and Usando (于山島 – 우산도) are next to Ulleungdo, but there are still no details on the distance between them and what products they have. You were chosen especially for this trip, so pay particular attention to your inspection. Also, we have plans to establish a settlement there, so be sure to prepare a detailed map with your report.”

Lee Gyu-won replied, Usando is just Ulleungdo. Usan was the name of the ancient country’s capital. Songjukdo is a small island about thirty ri offshore (相距爲三數十里). The products there are rosewood trees and pipestem bamboo.”

The king said, “It is called either Usando or Songjukdo (敎曰 或稱芋山島 或稱松竹島), which are both written in the Yeojiseungram (輿地勝覽 – 여지승람). It is also called Songdo (松島 – 송도) and Jukdo (竹島 – 죽도). Together with Usando, there are three islands that make up what is called Ulleungdo. Inspect the situation on all of them.

Originally, the Samcheok commander (三陟營將 – 삼척 영장) and the Wolsong commander (越松萬戶 – 월송 만호) took turns searching Ulleungdo, but they were all careless, inspecting only the exterior of the island. This has led to these evil practices.

Lee Gyu-won said, “I will go deep inside and conduct my inspection. Some say that Songdo and Jukdo are east of Ulleungdo, but there is only Songjukdo, no separate Songdo and Jukdo.”

The king asked, “Did you possibly hear that from previous inspectors?”

Lee Gyu-won said, “I have not yet talked with previous inspectors, but that is the gist of what I have heard.”

Notice that King Kojong said that Ulleungdo had two neighboring islands, “Usando” and “Songjukdo,” but that Lee Gyu-won said that Ulleungdo had only one neighboring island, “Songjukdo.” Though the two disagreed on Usando, they both agreed that “Songjukdo” was a neighboring island of Ulleungdo. Again, that suggests that the name, Usando, was in the process of being replaced by “Songjukdo,” which both King Kojong and Lee said was also referred to as “Songdo” and “Jukdo.”

Korean maps had so far shown Ulleungdo with one neighboring island, which suggests that “Usando,” “Songjukdo,” “Songdo,” and “Jukdo” were all competing for that island’s name. However, when Lee Gyu-won inspected Ulleungdo in 1882, he found that it had two neighboring islands, Jukdo (竹島) and Dohang (島項), which appear on the following section of Lee’s 1882 map of Ulleungdo.



Notice that the above map shows Jukdo (竹島) was located where Ulleungdo’s neighboring island of Jukdo is today, and that Dohang (島項) was located where Ulleungdo’s neighboring island of Gwaneumdo is today. The above map is the only old Korean map to show Ulleungdo with two neighboring islands that were actually named. All the other maps probably considered Gwaneumdo to be more of a cape than an island. In fact, the name, Dohang (島項), which means “Island Neck” suggests that the person who named it did not consider it an island since the two Chinese characters are in reverse order. Koreans almost always put the character meaning “island” (島 – “do”) at the end of the name, not the beginning. The name, “Island Neck,” suggests that the person who named it just considered it to be a cape of the main island of Ulleungdo, which was only about 100 meters away. Lee Gyu-won may have decided to call Dohang an island because King Kojong had been insisting that there were two islands.

According to his diary, Lee was unable to find any island named “Usando” or “Songjukdo,” even though the residents on Ulleungdo said they had heard that there was a neighboring island called by those names. The residents, however, could not tell him where it was. Again, that suggests that “Usando” and “Songjukdo” were just alternative names for Jukdo. In 1882, Jukdo just happened to be the current popular name with the residents of Ulleungdo. Koreans, however, seem to have been fickle because by 1899 Usando was once again being used to refer to Ulleungdo’s neighboring island, as the following section of a map from an 1899 Korean geography book shows:



Notice that the small island off the east coast of Ulleungdo is labeled as Usan (于山) and is located in approximately the same location as present-day Ulleungdo’s neighboring island of Jukdo, which is 2.2 kilometers off Ulleungdo’s east shore. The map even used lines of longitude, which clearly show that Usando was a neighboring island of Ulleungdo, and not Liancourt Rocks (Dokdo), which were ninety-two kilometers farther southeast.

In June 1899, the Korean government sent officials to Ulleungdo to inspect the island. On September 23 of that same year, Korea’s Hwangseong Newpaper printed an article that talked about Ulleungdo and that inspection. Here is a section of the article and my translation of the first couple of sentences:



In the sea east of Uljin is an island named Ulleung. Of its six, small neighboring islands, Usando/Jukdo (于山島竹圖) are/is the most prominent (崔著者). The Daehanjiji says that Ulleungdo is the old Country of Usan. It has an area of 100 ri. Three peaks stand out (律兀).

Notice that it says that Ulleungdo had six neighboring islands and that Usando/Jukdo was the most prominent. I think the “Usando/Jukdo” mentioned in the article was referring to one island with two names. In other words, I think the newspaper was saying that Ulleungdo’s most prominent neighboring island was called both “Usando” and “Jukdo,” both of which had been used to refer to the same neighboring island of Ulleungdo on previous maps.

By the way, the portion of the article outlined in red is translated as follows:

In the past, “water animals” (水獸) that looked like “cows without horns” (牛形無角) lived there and were called “gaji” (可之).

The “water animals that looked like cows without horns” were sea lions, which the article said “used to live” on Ulleungdo. That means they were no longer living there in 1899. That is more evidence that Usando, which the article described as Ulleungdo’s most prominent neighboring island, was not Liancourt Rocks (Dokdo) since sea lions were still living on Liancourt Rocks in 1899 and continued to do so until the 1950s.

Another reason I think that the Usando/Jukdo reference in the 1899 article was just two names for the same island is that in Korea’s 1900 Imperial Edict 41, which made Ulleungdo and its neighboring islands a county of Gangwon Province, Usando was not listed as a neighboring island, in spite of the fact that it was described as Ulleungdo’s most prominent neighboring island just a year earlier. Again, that suggests that Usando was just an alternative name for Ulleungdo’s neighboring island of Jukdo. Here is a translation of the first two articles of Korea’s 1900 Imperial Edict 41.

勅令第四一號
鬱陵島를 鬱島로 改稱고 島監을 郡守로 改正할件
第一條 鬱陵島를 鬱島라 改稱하야 江原道에 附屬하고 島監을 郡守로 改正해야 官制中에 編入고 郡等은 五等으로 事
第二條 郡廳位置 台霞洞으로 定고 區域은 鬱陵全島와 竹島石島를管轄할事

Imperial Edict No. 41

Ulleungdo will be renamed “Uldo” (鬱島), and Island Administrator will be renamed County Head

Article 1. Ulleungdo will be renamed Uldo (鬱島) and be made a part of Gangwon Province. Island Administrator will be amended to County Head, and incorporated into the civil service system as a fifth level official.

Article 2. The county office will be located at Taehadong (台霞洞) and have jurisdiction over the whole island of Ulleung (鬱陵全島) and Jukdo/Seokdo (竹島石島).

Notice that the edict said that the county office would have jurisdiction over the whole island of Ulleung (鬱陵全島) and Jukdo/Seokdo (竹島石島). Notice also that it did not mention anything about Usando, which was described as being Ulleungdo’s most prominent neighboring island just one year earlier. That suggests that the 1899 newspaper article was using the phrase Usando/Jukdo to refer to one island with two names, and that the king chose the name “Jukdo” over “Usando” for his 1900 Imperial Edict 41.

Another question is how did the 1900 Imperial Edict deal with the other five neighboring islands mentioned in the 1899 newspaper article? I think it dealt with them by using the word “Seokdo” (石島) as a catchall phrase. In other words, I think the edict was saying the county office woud have jurisdiction over “Ulleungdo, Jukdo, and the other surrounding rocky islets.” In Korean, “Seokdo” (石島) means “Rock Island.” That would explain why the name “Seokdo” never appeared on any map of Ulleungdo or in any other Korean document talking about Ullleungdo.

Conclusion

The An Yong-bok incident in the 1690s renewed Korean interest in Ulleungdo and helped win Japanese recognition of Korean jurisdiction over the island. The incident also led to the determination that Usando was a small, neighboring island just off Ulleungdo’s east shore, instead of her west shore, which was what previous maps had shown.

Regardless of whether An Yong-bok’s Usando was Liancourt Rocks or Ulleungdo’s neighboring island of Jukdo, the Joseon government never recognized Usando as being Liancourt Rocks. Almost all of Korea’s maps after the An Yong-bok incident showed Usando as being, almost certainly, Ulleungdo’s neighboring island of Jukdo, which is 2.2 kilometers off Ulleungdo’s east shore. The only consequence that seems to have come about by An’s claiming that the Japanese referred to Usando as “Songdo” (Matsushima) was that Koreans, eventually started referring to Ulleungdo’s neighboring island of Jukdo as “Songdo.”

By 1882, Ulleungdo’s neighboring island of Jukdo was being referred to by a variety of names, including Usando, Songjukdo, Songdo, and Jukdo. By 1899, the names for the island had been narrowed down to “Usando” and “Jukdo.” And by 1900, the Korean government seems to have settled on one name for the island, “Jukdo.” The name, “Seokdo” (石島), in the 1900 Imperial Edict was most likely just a catchall phrase used to refer to all the other small, rocky islets around Ulleungdo.

Korea had no maps of Liancourt Rocks (Dokdo), and the only possible references to the islets in Korean documents were vague and inaccurate. One thing is certain, however; Usando was not Liancourt Rocks (Dokdo).

Japanese Translation Provided by Kaneganese

(Gerryの投稿の日本語訳です。)

肅宗実録の1696年9月25日の項に安龍福が朝鮮王朝の当局者に、鬱陵島の近くの海中で日本人漁師達に5月に遭遇した事件について述べています。安の証言の部分は次の通りです。

“(国境問題を管轄する)備辺司が安龍福達を尋問したところ、安はこのように答えた。”元は東萊の出身なのですが、母を尋ねて蔚山へ行き、そこで僧の雷憲達と会いました。彼等に海産物が豊富な鬱陵島への旅の事を詳しく話したところ、とても興味を示したので、寧海出身の劉日夫という船乗り達と鬱陵島に渡航したのです。主峰の三峯は三角山より高く、北から南まで、2日の距離で、東西も同じです。山には沢山の種類の樹木が茂り、鷹やカラス、そして山猫が多数生息しています。日本の船が沢山停泊しており、船乗り達が怖がっていました。

そこで私は船の舳先へと進み、叫びました。「鬱陵島は我々の領土だ、何故日本人がやってくるのだ。全員捕えるぞ。」

日本人は「我々は元々松島に住んでおり、魚をとるためにたまたまここへやってきたので、ちょうど戻るところだ。」

そこで私はこう言いました。「松島は子山島だ。それは我が国の地なのに一体何故そこに住むことが出来るのだ」…”

日本人はこの当時Liancourt Rocks(竹島)を松島と呼んでおり、韓国人はこの”松島”がLiancourt Rocksだと言います。そしてそれを根拠に、子山島(于山島)が独島(Liancourt Rocks)の古名だと主張するのです。しかしながら、その理由付けについて問題になるのは、当時の韓国の地図は于山島をLiancourt Rocksではなく鬱陵島の近隣の島として描いることです。

次は三陟の県知事である朴昌錫によって1711年に作成された韓国の鬱陵島の地図です。

地図1:鬱陵島圖形(1711)朴昌錫

“于山島”と記された小さな島が鬱陵島の東沖に描かれています。

地図2:鬱陵島圖形(1711) 于山島付近拡大図

小さな島の上に次のように書かれていることがお分かりでしょうか。

“海長竹田 – 所謂 于山島
海長竹の沢山生えているところーいわゆる于山島”

海長竹は、約6メートルにもなる大きな竹で、つまり地図の于山島は、竹の生育に必要な土のない荒涼とした岩山のLiancourt Rocksではありえないのです。しかしながら、鬱陵島の2.2km東沖にある隣接島の竹嶼には海長竹の生育に必要な土壌があります。事実、張漢相が1694年の鬱陵島の検察後に行った報告書において、次のように記されています。

“東方五里許有一小島不甚高大海長竹叢生於一面
(鬱陵島の)東方2キロメートルの所に小さな島があり、その島は高くもなく大きくもないが、一面に竹が生い茂っている。”

上記の報告書にある島が鬱陵島の付属島である竹嶼であることはほぼ確実です。また、1711年の地図に描かれた于山島もその位置と海長竹の記述からして、竹嶼であることも疑う余地の無いことでしょう。

安龍福の証言には一貫性がなくて分かりづらいため、彼の言うところの“松島”がどの島を指しているのか、はっきりとは分かりません。例えば、彼が言う朝鮮半島やLiancourt Rocksから鬱陵島の間の距離は一致しません。しかしながら、安の言う于山島がLiancourt Rocksであれ竹嶼であれ、明らかなことは、朝鮮政府が于山島を鬱陵島の付属島である竹嶼と考えていたたとは確かで、そのことは後に、朝鮮人が鬱陵島の付属島である竹嶼を“松島”と呼びはじめたことにつながっているようです。最終的には、1882年には高宗自身が松島は鬱陵島の付属島である竹嶼の別名である、と言っているのです。

安龍福の”松島”から高宗の”松島”

1690年代におこった安龍福の事件の後、李朝朝鮮は鬱陵島に興味を示すようになり、定期的に島に検察官を派遣するようになります。そして、安の事件によってもたらされた結果のひとつに、以前とは異なり、韓国の地図が于山島を鬱陵島の西ではなく、東にある小さな島として描き始めたことがあります。

以下に掲げるのは安の事件の後に描かれた鬱陵島の地図です。于山島が鬱陵島のすぐ東沖に浮かぶ小さな付属島として描かれていることがお分かりでしょうか。

地図3:海東地圖(1750s)

上にあげた海東地圖では、于山島が、現在の竹嶼の位置にほぼ近い鬱陵島のすぐ傍に小さな島として描かれています。

地図4:輿地圖(1736-67)

この1736年から1767年の間に作成された輿地圖では、于山島が現在の竹嶼の位置にほぼ近い、鬱陵島のすぐ東沖に描かれています。

地図5:朝鮮地圖(1750-1768)

この朝鮮地圖はおそらく1750年から1768年の間に作成されたと思われますが、またしても于山島を現在の竹嶼とほぼ同じ位置に、鬱陵島に隣接する島として描いています。実際、この地図には距離を示すグリッド線が引かれており、鬱陵島本当からの于山島の距離が10キロメートルであることが分かります。

地図6:地乘(1776-1800)

この地乘は、1776年から1800年の間に作成されたものです。またしても、于山島を鬱陵島の東沖にある現在の竹嶼の位置にほぼ近い場所に浮かぶ小さな島として描いています。

上掲の地図は全て、1711年から1800年の間に描かれたもので、全て于山島の位置を現在の竹嶼の位置のほぼ近くに描いています。そして、全て于山島をLiancourt Rocks (竹島)のような二つの大きな岩ではなく、単一の島として描いているのです。

そこで今度は1770年の韓国の文献である東國文獻備考について考えて見ます。

“輿地志云 鬱陵于山皆于山國地, 于山則倭所謂松島也
輿地志によれば、鬱陵島と于山は皆、于山国のことで、于山は倭(日本)の言うところの松島である。”

この文献は、韓国側の鬱陵島の地図が全て、于山島を鬱陵島の隣接等である竹嶼のほぼ近くに描いている時期に記述されています。こうした韓国自身の地図と考え合わせると、上記の記述は基本的に、鬱陵島の隣接島である竹嶼が倭(日本)の言う松島であると言っているようです。

次に1793年10月1日の日省録の記入からの抜粋です。

“臣按本曹謄錄蔚陵外島其名松島卽古于山國也
官僚がみるところ、Yejoの記録にある鬱陵島の傍にある松島は昔の于山国の一部である。”

1793年まで、”松島”が鬱陵島の隣接島を指すのに使用されていることにお気づきでしょうか。

1808年には、韓国の文献である萬機要覽に次のような記述があります。

“輿地志云 鬱陵于山皆于山國地, 于山則倭所謂松島也
輿地志によれば、鬱陵島と于山はどちらも于山国であり、于山は倭(日本)人のいう松島である。”

この記述が1770年の東國文獻備考と同じ文章なのにお気づきでしょうか。1808年の時点で、朝鮮の人々は于山島が日本人の言うところの“松島”である、と言い続けているわけです。そして同時に、朝鮮製の地図では于山島を鬱陵島の隣接島である竹嶼として描き続けているのです。

次の地図は、1835年に作成された靑邱圖です。グリッドが地図の端に書かれており、朝鮮の10里を表しています。1里は400メートルに等しいです。

地図7:靑邱圖(1835)

“于山”と記された小さな島が鬱陵島の東沖1グリッド、つまり4キロメートルの所に描かれていることがお分かりでしょうか。鬱陵島の隣接島の竹嶼は東沖約2.2キロメートルにあり、つまり、于山と記されたこの島は、ほぼ確実に鬱陵島の隣接島である竹嶼であることは間違いないでしょう。

1869年12月、日本の明治政府の外務省が李朝朝鮮へ担当官を派遣して当該国の情報収集の任務に当たらせます。彼らの報告書に鬱陵島についての次のような記述があります。

図1:朝鮮国交際始末内探書(1869)

“竹島と松島が朝鮮の附属になった経緯について
松島は竹島(現在の鬱陵島)の隣の島で、松島に関するこれまでの記録がない。竹島に関しては、元禄期(1688-1704)に暫らくの間、朝鮮から人が居留していたが、現在は以前と同じく無人島となっている。その島は竹や竹より太い葭(アシ・ヨシ)が生えている。人参なども自生しており、また海産物も豊富であると聞いている。”

この文献で、松島が”陵島(竹島)の隣島”であり、今までの記録がないと記されていることにお気づきでしょうか。言い換えれば、韓国側が日本側の担当官に対して「松島は鬱陵島の隣の島だ」と言ったことになります。この日本側の文献は于山島について何の言及もありませんが、この于山島は、それ以前の韓国側の地図や文献では確かに記述されていたものです。このことから、1870年までには、”松島”と言う名称が”于山島”に取って代わったか、鬱陵島の隣接島の名称として代用されるようになったと思われます。このことは、1882年の高宗と鬱陵島検察へ出かける準備をしていた李奎遠の間で交わされた会話の内容とも呼応します。以下がその内容です。

“高宗19年(1882)4月7日条より

高宗は李奎遠を前に呼び、出発の祝辞を述べました。

王曰く「近頃、鬱陵島に他の国の者が絶えず往来して島を占有する、という被害がでている。松竹島と于山島は鬱陵島の傍にあるはずだが、互いの距離はその産物についての詳細が分かっていない。君は特別にこの検察使に選ばれたわけであるから、しっかりと仕事をせよ。民を住まわせる村を作るかもしれないから、詳細な地図と記録をとるように。」

李奎遠曰く「于山島は鬱陵島のことです。つまり于山とは、彼の国の昔の首都の名前です。松竹島は島から30里ほど沖の小さな島です。産物は、檀香と簡竹です。」

王曰く「芋山島(于山島)あるいは松竹島と呼ばれるものは、輿地勝覽に記述がある。それはまた、松島、竹島とも呼ばれ、于山島と3つあわせて鬱陵島と呼ばれる島を成している。全てについてその事情を検察せよ。そもそも三陟と越松の土候が鬱陵島の調査を行っていたが、皆いい加減で島の外周しか検察していない。こうしたことが外国人による弊害を招いたのだ。」

李奎遠曰く「深く分け入って検察を行います。その島は鬱陵島の東にあり、時に松島とも竹島とも呼ばれています。しかし、そこにあるのは、松竹島で、松島と竹島と言う別々の島があるわけではありません。」

王曰く「それは前任の検察使から聞いたのか?」

李奎遠曰く「いいえ前任者とはまだ話をしておりません。しかし、これが前任者の話の要旨であると聞き及んでいます。」”

高宗が鬱陵島には二つの隣接島、”于山島”と”松竹島”がある,と言っているのに対し、李奎遠は鬱陵島には”松竹島”と言う隣接島一島があるのみ、と言っていることにお気づきでしょうか。于山島については二人とも意見を異にしていますが、”松竹島”が鬱陵島の隣接島であることには合意しています。またしても、このことは于山島と言う名称が”松竹島”と言う、高宗と李の二人ともが”松島”とも”竹島”とも呼ばれるといった、その名称に取って代わられる過程にあったことを示唆しています。

韓国の地図においてはそれまでは、鬱陵島のそばに一つの島があり、”于山島””松竹島””松島””竹島”と言った名称は全て、その島の名前を各々指していました。しかしながら、李奎遠が1882年に鬱陵島を検察した時、竹島と島項と言う二つの島がある事を発見します。そのことは、1882年の李による次の地図に表れています。

地図8:鬱陵島外圖(1882) 北東部拡大図

上掲の地図は竹島(Jukdo)を鬱陵島の隣接島である現在の竹嶼の位置に、島項(Dohang)を現在の観音島の位置に描いています。この地図が韓国の古地図において唯一鬱陵島の二つの隣接島を名称を記して記載したただ一つの物になります。他の地図は全て、おそらく観音島を島、と言うよりは岬として見なしていたのだと思われます。実際、Dohang (島項)と言う名称は、”島の首”と言う意味で、項島となっていない事から、この名前を付けた人物は観音島を島ではない、と認識していたことが伺えます。韓国人は島を意味するときはいつも島と言う漢字を語頭ではなく語尾に付けます。この”島の首”と言う名称は、命名者が100メートルしかない鬱陵島の岬である、と考えていたために名づけられた、と思われるのです。李奎遠は、高宗が鬱陵島には二つの隣接島がある、と主張していたことから、この島項を一つの島として呼ぶ事にしたのかもしれません。

彼の検察日記によると、鬱陵島の住民がそうした名前の島について聴いたことがある、と言っているにも関わらず、李は”于山島”と”松竹島”と言う名前の島を見つけることが出来ませんでした。しかしながら、住民たちは、それらの島が何処にあるのか、誰も分かりませんでした。その事はまた、”于山島”と”松竹島”と言う名称が竹嶼の別名に過ぎない事を示唆しています。1882年に、竹島(Jukdo)と言う名称が当時の鬱陵島の住民に最もよく使用された名称になぜかなったようです。しかし、1899年の大韓帝国の地理の教科書に、再度于山島と言う名称が鬱陵島の隣接島として使用されていることから、韓国人によるこの島の名称は必ずしも安定していなかったようです。

地図9:大韓全図(1899)

鬱陵島の東沖に描かれた小さな島が于山と記載されていることにお気づきでしょうか。その島は現在の鬱陵島東沖2.2キロメートルに位置する竹嶼とほぼ同じ位置に描かれています。この地図には経度まで記載されており、于山島が鬱陵島の隣接島である事を明らかに示しています。

1899年、韓国政府は鬱陵島を検察するために担当官を派遣します。同年9月23日の皇城新聞には、この視察についての記事が載っています。以下に当該記事の最初の数行を載せます。

図2:皇城新聞記事(1899)

“蔚珍の東方沖の海中に、鬱陵と言う名の島がある。その島には6つの隣接した小さな島嶼があり、それらのうち于山島竹島がもっとも主要な島である。大韓地誌には、鬱陵島は昔の于山国ことで面積は100里ある、と載っている。3つの峰がそびえている。”

「鬱陵島には6つの付属島があり、于山島竹島がもっとも主要な島である」と言っている事に注目して下さい。私は、ここでいう于山島竹島は、一つの島を二つの名前で表しているのだと考えています。言い換えれば、新聞記事は鬱陵島の最も主要な隣接島は”于山島”と”竹島(Jukdo)”と言う、以前の地図で同じ島を示すのに使われていた、この二つの名前で呼ばれていたと言っていると思うのです。

ところで、記事の赤で囲んだ部分は次のように言っています。

“過去には、角(つの)の無い牛に似た“海獣”が過去に生息し、可之(ガジ)と呼ばれた。”

“角(つの)の無い牛に似た海獣”は、アシカのことで、記事では鬱陵島に”以前は生息してた”とあります。つまり、1899年にはもう鬱陵島にはアシカが生息していなかったことになります。この事は、鬱陵島の主要な島であると記述のある于山島が Liancourt Rocks (竹島/Dokdo)ではないという更なる証拠である、と言えるでしょう。 Liancourt Rocks には1899年にはまだアシカが生息しており、1950年代までは確認されているからです。

1899年のこの記事中の于山島竹島が同一の島に対する二つの名称である、と考えるもう一つの理由は、大韓帝国勅令第41号にあります。この勅令では、鬱陵島とその隣接する島が江原道の管轄である事を定めていますが、前年に鬱陵島の最も主要な隣接島であると書かれた于山島を、なぜか隣接島の中に含めていません。またしても、于山島が鬱陵島の隣接島である竹嶼の単なる別名であることを示唆しているのです。次に揚げるのは、1900年の大韓帝国勅令第41号の最初の二つの条項です。

“勅令第41号 鬱陵島は鬱島と改称し、島監は郡守と改正する。

第一条 鬱陵島は鬱島と改称し、江原道の附属とする。島監は郡守と改正し、五等の官吏として官僚制度に編入する。

第二条 郡役所は台霞洞に置き、鬱陵島全土と竹島石島を管轄する事とする。”

勅令で「郡役所が鬱陵島全土と竹島石島を管轄する」とされていることに注目して下さい。わずか前年に鬱陵島の最も主要な島であると新聞に書かれたはずの于山島について、何も記述がありません。このことは、1899年の新聞記事は于山島竹島と言う言葉を二つの名前を持つ一つの島として使用したのであり、高宗は1900年の勅令において”于山島”を捨てて”竹島”を選んだ,と言う事を示唆しているのです。

ここで1900年の勅令では、1899年の新聞記事にあった他の5島についてどう取り扱っているのか、と言う疑問がわきます。私は、石島と言う言葉を包括的な用語として採用する事にしたのだと思います。つまり、勅令では「郡役所は鬱陵島、竹島、そして周囲の岩で出来た小島を管轄する事とする。」と言っているのだと思うのです。石島は韓国語でも石の島、と言う意味です。この事は、石島とういう名称が鬱陵島を描いたどの地図にも出てこなかったのか、説明していると思います。

結論

1690年代の安龍福の事件は朝鮮時代の人々の鬱陵島に対する関心をよび起こし、日本側に鬱陵島を朝鮮領土として認めさせる事を勝ち得たといえます。この事件はまた、それまでの地図に描かれていたように于山島が鬱陵島の西側でなく、東沖に浮かぶ隣接島である事を決定付けた、とも言えます。

安龍福の言う于山島がLiancourt Rocksであるか竹嶼であるかに関わらず、朝鮮政府は于山島をLiancourt Rocksであると認識していたことは一度もありませんでした。安の事件以降の韓国側の地図は殆ど全て、于山島を鬱陵島の2.2km東沖にある竹嶼として描いています。安が行った「于山島は倭(日本)人の言うところの松島だ」という主張によって得られた唯一の結果は、それ以降韓国人が次第に鬱陵島の隣接島である竹嶼を”松島”として呼びはじめた事です。

1882年までには、鬱陵島の隣接島である竹嶼は、”于山島””松竹島””松島””竹島”と言った様々な名称で呼ばれていたようです。1899年までに、それらの名称は于山島”と”竹島”の二つに絞られ、1900年には大韓帝国政府は”竹島”と言う名称のみを使用する事で落ち着いたようです。1900年の勅令に出てくる”石島”は、鬱陵島の周囲にある石で出来た小島を表す包括的な呼称であると思われます。

韓国にはLiancourt Rocks (竹島/Dokdo)を正確に描いた地図は一つもありません。この島である可能性のある文献の記述にしても、曖昧で不正確です。唯一確実なのは、于山島はLiancourt Rocks (竹島/Dokdo)ではない、と言うことだけです。

Links to More Posts on Takeshima/Dokdo (With Japanese translations)

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 1

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 2

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 3

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 4

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 4 Supplement

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 5

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 6

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 7

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 8

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 9

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 10

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 11

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 1

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 2

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 2 Supplement

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 3

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 4

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 5

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 6

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 7

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 8

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 9

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 10

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 11

Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Maps 12

Posted in Verus Historia | 40 Comments »



40 Responses to “Lies, Half-truths, & Dokdo Video, Part 8”
comment number 1 by: Lies, Half-truths, & Dokdo Video, Maps 7 » Occidentalism
April 7th, 2007 at 7:02 pm

[...] Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 8 [...]

comment number 2 by: Lies, Half-truths, & Dokdo Video, Maps 6 » Occidentalism
April 7th, 2007 at 7:05 pm

[...] Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 8 [...]

comment number 3 by: Lies, Half-truths, & Dokdo Video, Maps 5 » Occidentalism
April 7th, 2007 at 7:08 pm

[...] Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 8 [...]

comment number 4 by: Lies, Half-truths, & Dokdo Video, Maps 4 » Occidentalism
April 7th, 2007 at 7:10 pm

[...] Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 8 [...]

comment number 5 by: Lies, Half-truths, & Dokdo Video, Maps 3 » Occidentalism
April 7th, 2007 at 7:12 pm

[...] Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 8 [...]

comment number 6 by: Lies, Half-truths, & Dokdo Video, Maps 2 Supplement » Occidentalism
April 7th, 2007 at 7:17 pm

[...] Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 8 [...]

comment number 7 by: Lies, Half-truths, & Dokdo Video, Maps 1 » Occidentalism
April 7th, 2007 at 7:20 pm

[...] Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 8 [...]

comment number 8 by: Lies, Half-truths, & Dokdo Video, Part 7 » Occidentalism
April 7th, 2007 at 7:24 pm

[...] Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 8 [...]

comment number 9 by: Lies, Half-truths, & Dokdo Video, Part 6 » Occidentalism
April 7th, 2007 at 7:27 pm

[...] Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 8 [...]

comment number 10 by: Lies, Half-truths, & Dokdo Video, Part 5 » Occidentalism
April 7th, 2007 at 7:29 pm

[...] Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 8 [...]

comment number 11 by: Lies, Half-truths, & Dokdo Video, Part 4 Supplement » Occidentalism
April 7th, 2007 at 7:32 pm

[...] Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 8 [...]

comment number 12 by: Lies, Half-truths, & Dokdo Video, Part 4 » Occidentalism
April 7th, 2007 at 7:34 pm

[...] Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 8 [...]

comment number 13 by: Lies, Half-truths, & Dokdo Video, Part 3 » Occidentalism
April 7th, 2007 at 7:36 pm

[...] Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 8 [...]

comment number 14 by: Lies, Half-truths, & Dokdo Video, Part 2 » Occidentalism
April 7th, 2007 at 7:41 pm

[...] Lies, Half-truths, and Dokdo Video, Part 8 [...]

comment number 15 by: ponta
April 7th, 2007 at 9:43 pm

Great post.

It makes perfectly make sense and makes many of the confusions clear.

Thanks.

comment number 16 by: ponta
April 8th, 2007 at 4:03 am

Ms Kim is a cool headed professor.
I am glad there is a intelligent like her.
She seems to have an adequate grasp of Dokdo, Yasukuni etc.

comment number 17 by: goda
April 8th, 2007 at 5:15 am

1.(1696)The Japanese said, “We are originally from Songdo (松島 – Matsushima),
2.(1696)Then I(An Yong-bok) said, “Songdo is Jasando (子山島) and that is also our country’s land.
3.(map ???? on inspection caused by An Yong-bok incident)
Usando is shown as a small, neighboring island off Ulleungdo’s the east shore with description of “so-called Usand”.
4.(map 1711)Fields of haejang bamboo — the so-called Usando(于山島)
and 東方五里許有一小島不甚高大海長竹叢生於一面
5.(map a.1750)Usando was shown as a small, neighboring island of Ulleungdo located very close to where Ulleungdo’s neighboring island of Jukdo is today with description of “so-called Usand”.
6.(map 1736-1767)Usando just off the east shore of Ulleungdo in a location very close in a location very close to when Ulleungdo’s neighboring island of Jukdo is today.
7.(map 1750-1768)Jukdo as a neighboring island of Ulleungdo in a location very close to where Ulleungdo’s neighboring island of Jukdo is today.
8.(map 1776-1800)Usando as a small island off the east coast of Ulleungdo in a location very close to where Ulleungdo’s neighboring island of Jukdo is today.
9.(1882)King Kojong, himself, said that Songdo was another name for Ulleungdo’s neighboring island of Jukdo.

and continues ……

Usando has thickly growing haejang bamboo but not in Liancourt Rocks (Dokdo).

It’s doubtlessly clear An Yong-bok’s Songdo is Jukdo not Liancourt Rocks (Dokdo).
This is LOGIC no one can be negative.

Thanks.

comment number 18 by: pacifist
April 8th, 2007 at 7:38 am

Gerry,
.
Thanks a lot.
This is the most logical and scientific theory I’ve ever read!
.
I hope Korean people and toadface will refute in the same manner.

comment number 19 by: Kaneganese
April 8th, 2007 at 8:45 am

Thank you, Gerry

I have just came back home and read it briefly. I will translate it to Japanese tomorrow.

Ahn’s incidents and his inconsistant testimony is mystery for Japanese. Presenting and arranging those historical maps and documents chronogically really help us to understand what really happened and what caused confusion that Usando was Takeshima to Korean. Unfortunately, “松島” was extremely common name for the islands in Japan. You can find three “松島”s in Oki alone. I think that was one of the reason why Meiji governement in 1800’s was confused about Today’s Takeshima, Ulleundo, Jukdo and non-existent Algonaut, along with westerner’s mapping errors and disorder made by huge regime change.

Ponta,

I think the article is about Prof.朴裕河. She was mentioned in Marmot’s too. I happened to read her book about a month ago in a local book store near my house, and I totally respect her effort that Korean woman who actually lives and works in academic world in Korea is trying to find the way to compromise each other. I only read the part of Takeshima, so maybe it is too early to say anything, but honestly, I don’t think her recognition of the problem is not that accurate. I would say better than nothing, though. I didn’t buy the book since I thought it wasn’t worth to buy. By the way, I was surprised when I found “tomojiro” recommended jion999 to read the book on Marmot later, since I wasn’t impressed her logic at all.

comment number 20 by: opp
April 8th, 2007 at 10:01 pm

Gerry,

The investigation of Ullengdo by 禹用鼎 was investigated in May, 1900. Therefore, the article on Korea’s Hwangseong Newpaper is an article before the investigation. The report of 禹用鼎’s investigation is here(P45-52). They didn’t go to Takeshima.

comment number 21 by: kteen
April 9th, 2007 at 2:36 am

Uh….
One thing, where do you people find the time to post, read(and in some cases, transalate) all that stuff?

comment number 22 by: Gerry-Bevers
April 9th, 2007 at 3:53 am

Hi Opp,

The September 23, 1899 Hwangseong Newspaper article talked about the Bae Gye-ju (裵季周)/Laporte (羅保得) inspection of Ulleungdo, which began in June 1899. As you said,the the U Yong-jong (禹用鼎) inspection did not happen until later.

Anyway, thank you for that link. It looks interesting.

Hi Kaneganese,

I am glad to hear you will be translating the post. Thank you.

comment number 23 by: opp
April 9th, 2007 at 4:30 am

Gerry,

Sorry, It’s my mistake.

BTW, I have some questions about Lee Gyu-won’s map.

He is drawing the 観音島(島項) as two islands. But there are actually only one.
He is drawing four acute angle rocks(兄弟巌,燭壱巌). But there are actually only three(三仙岩).
He is drawing 大巌 at the north of Ullengdo. But I cannot find the rock at the north of ullengdo actually. (I think 門城 is present 孔岩)

What do you think about these questions.

comment number 24 by: Gerry-Bevers
April 9th, 2007 at 6:35 am

Hi Opp,

I think the reason that Lee Gyu-won drew Dohang (島項) as two islands was to show the island, itself, and the cape pointing to it. Dohang (島項) means “Island Neck,” and even today Koreans call that cape “Seom Mok,” which is the pure Korean word for “Dohang” (島項).

I am not sure about the 兄弟巌, but Lee may have included a nearby smaller rock, or maybe one of the rocks has collapsed since Lee’s time. Notice that one of the three rocks is half the size of the other two. I tend to think that one of the original three rocks has collapsed because one of the three rocks (三仙岩) Koreans are including today seems to be a little too far away to really be considered part of the group.

Daeam (大巌) was almost certainly present-day Ddan Bawui (딴바위). Picture of Ddan Bawui

Even though some old Korean maps have referred to “Munseong” (門城) as Gongam (孔岩), I do not think it was present day “Hole Rock”/”Elephant Rock,” which is out in the water offshore. I think it was what Koreans today refer to as “Punghyeol” (風穴), which is on the north shore of Ulleungdo and is known for having a cool breeze that comes up from a hole in the back of the small cave. Here is a pictue of Punghyeol (風穴).

comment number 25 by: GTOMR
April 9th, 2007 at 6:37 am

Mr.opp,
Two 島項 is the figures of 観音島,one is the view from west and the other is from east.

三仙巌 is consist from 2 rocks(兄弟巌) + 1 rock(燭臺巌)
The 大巌 seems to be ”竹巌”.
孔岩(Hole Rk)seems to be “虹兎?岩”.
孔岩 on the Ullungdo island seems to be ”門城”.

comment number 26 by: opp
April 9th, 2007 at 10:17 am

Gerry&GTOMR

Thank you.

My presumption about Lee Gyu-won’s Dohang(島項) is the name of couple of 島(Gwaneumdo) and 項(Seom Mok)
The reason is follows

1.In Lee’s map, names label is written most outside. But 島項 is labeled between two islands. This means that 島項 is name of Seom Mok or couple of Gwaneumdo and Seom Mok. Please see 兄弟巌. 兄弟巌 is labeled between two acute angle rocks.

2.However, Lee is recognizing the 島項 as a island too. Please see here(p22).
He wrote that “有二小島形如臥牛而左右回旋勢若相抱一曰竹島一曰島項.”

3.島項 is strange as the name of the island(same as Gerry’s insistence).

It meets these requirements if it is assumed that 島項 is the name of couple of Gwaneumdo and Seom Mok.

This is a detailed map of ullengdo.
This is a picture which shows the geographical features of Seom Mok.

comment number 27 by: Kaneganese
April 9th, 2007 at 11:16 am

Gerry, very minor mistakes I have noticed are following two words.

The above map of Ulleungdo comes from the Joseonjido and was probably made sometime between 1750 and 1768. Again, it shows Jukdo(→Usando?)

In fact, the name, Dohang (島項), which means “Island Neck” suggests that the person who named it did not consider it an island since the two Chinese characters are in reverse order. Koreans almost always put the character meaning “island” (圖 – “do”) 圖→島?

(Japanese translation for Gerry’s post)
(Gerryの投稿の日本語訳です。)

肅宗実録の1696年9月25日の項に安龍福が朝鮮王朝の当局者に、鬱陵島の近くの海中で日本人漁師達に5月に遭遇した事件について述べています。安の証言の部分は次の通りです。
“(国境問題を管轄する)備辺司が安龍福達を尋問したところ、安はこのように答えた。”元は東萊の出身なのですが、母を尋ねて蔚山へ行き、そこで僧の雷憲達と会いました。彼等に海産物が豊富な鬱陵島への旅の事を詳しく話したところ、とても興味を示したので、寧海出身の劉日夫という船乗り達と鬱陵島に渡航したのです。主峰の三峯は三角山より高く、北から南まで、2日の距離で、東西も同じです。山には沢山の種類の樹木が茂り、鷹やカラス、そして山猫が多数生息しています。日本の船が沢山停泊しており、船乗り達が怖がっていました。
そこで私は船の舳先へと進み、叫びました。「鬱陵島は我々の領土だ、何故日本人がやってくるのだ。全員捕えるぞ。」
日本人は「我々は元々松島に住んでおり、魚をとるためにたまたまここへやってきたので、ちょうど戻るところだ。」
そこで私はこう言いました。「松島は子山島だ。それは我が国の地なのに一体何故そこに住むことが出来るのだ」…”

日本人はこの当時Liancourt Rocks(竹島)を松島と呼んでおり、韓国人はこの”松島”がLiancourt Rocksだと言います。そしてそれを根拠に、子山島(于山島)が独島(Liancourt Rocks)の古名だと主張するのです。しかしながら、その理由付けについて問題になるのは、当時の韓国の地図は于山島をLiancourt Rocksではなく鬱陵島の近隣の島として描いることです。

次は三陟の県知事である朴昌錫によって1711年に作成された韓国の鬱陵島の地図です。

地図1:鬱陵島圖形(1711)朴昌錫

“于山島”と記された小さな島が鬱陵島の東沖に描かれています。

地図2:鬱陵島圖形(1711) 于山島付近拡大図

小さな島の上に次のように書かれていることがお分かりでしょうか。

“海長竹田 – 所謂 于山島
海長竹の沢山生えているところーいわゆる于山島”

海長竹は、約6メートルにもなる大きな竹で、つまり地図の于山島は、竹の生育に必要な土のない荒涼とした岩山のLiancourt Rocksではありえないのです。しかしながら、鬱陵島の2.2km東沖にある隣接島の竹嶼には海長竹の生育に必要な土壌があります。事実、張漢相が1694年の鬱陵島の検察後に行った報告書において、次のように記されています。

“東方五里許有一小島不甚高大海長竹叢生於一面
(鬱陵島の)東方2キロメートルの所に小さな島があり、その島は高くもなく大きくもないが、一面に竹が生い茂っている。”

上記の報告書にある島が鬱陵島の付属島である竹嶼であることはほぼ確実です。また、1711年の地図に描かれた于山島もその位置と海長竹の記述からして、竹嶼であることも疑う余地の無いことでしょう。

安龍福の証言には一貫性がなくて分かりづらいため、彼の言うところの“松島”がどの島を指しているのか、はっきりとは分かりません。例えば、彼が言う朝鮮半島やLiancourt Rocksから鬱陵島の間の距離は一致しません。しかしながら、安の言う于山島がLiancourt Rocksであれ竹嶼であれ、明らかなことは、朝鮮政府が于山島を鬱陵島の付属島である竹嶼と考えていたたとは確かで、そのことは後に、朝鮮人が鬱陵島の付属島である竹嶼を“松島”と呼びはじめたことにつながっているようです。最終的には、1882年には高宗自身が松島は鬱陵島の付属島である竹嶼の別名である、と言っているのです。

安龍福の”松島”から高宗の”松島”

1690年代におこった安龍福の事件の後、李朝朝鮮は鬱陵島に興味を示すようになり、定期的に島に検察官を派遣するようになります。そして、安の事件によってもたらされた結果のひとつに、以前とは異なり、韓国の地図が于山島を鬱陵島の西ではなく、東にある小さな島として描き始めたことがあります。

以下に掲げるのは安の事件の後に描かれた鬱陵島の地図です。于山島が鬱陵島のすぐ東沖に浮かぶ小さな付属島として描かれていることがお分かりでしょうか。

地図3:海東地圖(1750s)

上にあげた海東地圖では、于山島が、現在の竹嶼の位置にほぼ近い鬱陵島のすぐ傍に小さな島として描かれています。

地図4:輿地圖(1736-67)

この1736年から1767年の間に作成された輿地圖では、于山島が現在の竹嶼の位置にほぼ近い、鬱陵島のすぐ東沖に描かれています。

地図5:朝鮮地圖(1750-1768)

この朝鮮地圖はおそらく1750年から1768年の間に作成されたと思われますが、またしても于山島を現在の竹嶼とほぼ同じ位置に、鬱陵島に隣接する島として描いています。実際、この地図には距離を示すグリッド線が引かれており、鬱陵島本当からの于山島の距離が10キロメートルであることが分かります。

地図6:地乘(1776-1800)

この地乘は、1776年から1800年の間に作成されたものです。またしても、于山島を鬱陵島の東沖にある現在の竹嶼の位置にほぼ近い場所に浮かぶ小さな島として描いています。

上掲の地図は全て、1711年から1800年の間に描かれたもので、全て于山島の位置を現在の竹嶼の位置のほぼ近くに描いています。そして、全て于山島をLiancourt Rocks (竹島)のような二つの大きな岩ではなく、単一の島として描いているのです。

そこで今度は1770年の韓国の文献である東國文獻備考

  • 最終更新:2009-08-22 10:43:36

このWIKIを編集するにはパスワード入力が必要です

認証パスワード